Council Tax and occupancy

By | May 25, 2017

care homeA Council Tax charge on a property generally requires that either the property is occupied or unoccupied. What is occupation for the purposes of Council Tax and how is it determined ?

Daily Charge

Council Tax charges are calculated on a daily basis and therefore the circumstances for each individual day should be taken in to account when calculating a charge. The Local Government Finance Act 1992 states that;

2  Liability to tax determined on a daily basis
(1)     Liability to pay council tax shall be determined on a daily basis.
(2)     For the purposes of determining for any day–
(a)     whether any property is a chargeable dwelling;
(b)     which valuation band is shown in the billing authority’s valuation list as applicable to any chargeable dwelling;
(c)     the person liable to pay council tax in respect of any such dwelling; or
(d)     whether any amount of council tax is subject to a discount and (if so) the amount of the discount,
it shall be assumed that any state of affairs subsisting at the end of the day had subsisted throughout the day

Sole or Main Residence

In order  to be considered as being resident in a property it must be a person’s ‘sole or main residence’ for the day in question. ‘Sole or main residence’ is not specifically defined in legislation however case-law has determined that a good indication of a person’s ‘sole or main residence’ would be to consider where an independent, outside observer, would say that person was living when presented with the information at hand. There is no minimum period of occupancy required to be regarded as being resident in a property (in some case residence can be regarded as taking place even if the property is not physically occupied)

If this consideration of ‘sole or main residence’ would indicate that they are no longer living in the property and there was no ‘intention to return’ to live in it then it is likely that they would no longer be regarded as resident for Council Tax purposes  and the property may be regarded as unoccupied.

What is a ‘Resident’ ?

The definition of resident is defined in Section 6 of the Local Government Finance Act 1992

“resident”, in relation to any dwelling, means an individual who has attained the age of 18 years and has his sole or main residence in the dwelling.

There is no minimum period of occupancy required to be regarded as being resident in a property (in some case residence can be regarded as taking place even if the property is not physically occupied)

What is Occupancy ?

Although occupancy and residence go hand in hand in most cases the two terms are separately defined within Council Tax legislation. A person can be in principal be in occupation of a property without being ‘resident’ in the property. Many Council Tax reductions or premiums require occupancy (such as the ‘long-term empty’ premium) and therefore do not directly appear to require ‘residence’.

An un-occupied dwelling is defined as

an “unoccupied dwelling” means a dwelling in which no one lives.

and likewise the definition of an occupied dwelling should be read on this basis

In appeal 0345M108475/037C the Valuation Tribunal, when considering the position of occupation versus residence stated that;

A property that is unoccupied is defined as one in which no one lives and while the appeal property may indeed have remained the Appellant’s main residence, to where she would return when the work being done was completed, she was not actually living in the dwelling during the period in issue in this appeal.

Similar comments were also made in respect of appeal 4725M179333/254C

The fact that the tenant’s sole or main residence had changed was not the determinative factor. Whilst a person’s sole or main residence can only be at one address on any one date, a person could potentially still occupy or furnish two dwellings at the same time.

This point however appears to need further clarification by way of Tribunal decisions and High Court appeal.

Discounts, Exemptions and Premiums

Some discounts, exemptions and premiums will only apply where a property is unoccupied. Where the property is occupied these particular adjustments will not apply to the Council Tax charge although they may apply following vacation of the occupiers.

Assistance from LGFA92

This article is solely the view of LGFA92 based on our interpretation of legislation. Your local authority is free to dispute this view. A binding decision may require the intervention of a valuation tribunal.

For further, written, assistance on this matter we’d be happy to provide a quote.

Contact us today. Email us at info@lgfa92.co.uk, Call us on 0191 6451118 or try the chat box below.

Related posts: